The Robot Will See You Now

Human uniqueness, AI musicians, surveillance capitalism and ditching Google

This episode was inspired by my new book – The Robot Will See You Now – which was published last week. It’s a multi-author volume I have co-edited with the theologian Stephen Williams, where we have gathered an array of theologians, academics and thinkers to explore how upcoming advances in robotics and artificial intelligence will revolutionise society, from healthcare to employment, from art to sex. And, perhaps more critically, how we as Christians should engage with and respond to these developments in cutting-edge technology. Excitingly, we have been able to invite our first guest on to Matters of Life and Death to discuss this – Nathan Mladin. Nathan is a researcher with the religion thinktank Theos and has written a chapter for The Robot Will See You Now. With his help we bat around some of the big ideas from the book and then look in more detail as his specialism – the concerning rise of ‘surveillance capitalism’.

You can find out more about The Robot Will See You Now, including how to order it in paperback or as an e-book, here.

Listen to other episodes of Matters of Life and Death or find us on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts, Google Podcasts, Podcast Addict, Castbox or whatever app you use to subscribe and receive new episodes sent straight to your device.

Leave a Reply

Tags
Most read posts
What can we learn from how the early church lived out their faith during their own pandemics?
Navigating the transitions of later life
How are young people different to those who came before, and what can we learn from them?
Living faithfully as we approach retirement, dependence, dementia and death
Investing in the next generation - Lessons from John Stott and others
Recent posts
How can the church engage in conversation about people with autism with care and compassion?
Can AI friends stop us feeling alone?
Science and religion in the 21st century
A bad law but also an inevitable one?
Identifying and confronting abuse, while caring for victims, has never been more important