Pregnancy crisis

A constructive Christian response, heads versus hearts, paternalistic gynaecologists, and ambiguity in the ultrasound clinic

Rates of unplanned pregnancies rose significantly during the coronavirus lockdowns. What kind of support is out there for women (and men) facing this situation, and how can the church try and plug the gaps? In this episode we speak with Sophie Guthrie-Kummer, who runs a charity in London which has offered pregnancy crisis counselling (among other services) for two decades, to hear what this work looks like and how Choices juggles the theological and social hot potatoes of pregnancy and abortion. And how can we respond to abortion in a way which cools tensions rather than inflames them? Can a pro-life believer offer truly non-directive counselling to a pregnant woman considering termination, or work with integrity in a hospital which carries out abortions?

A good place to get help if you or someone you know is experiencing an unplanned pregnancy (or if you’d like to find your local pregnancy crisis centre in the UK) is Pregnancy Choices Directory.

You can find out more about Choices on their website.

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